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Old News Stories
Union Has Support in Ga. Mountains, 1861

From The New York Times
Jan. 29, 1861

IMPORTANT FROM GEORGIA.

UNION MOVEMENT IN THE MOUNTAINS.

Richmond, Va., Sunday, Jan. 27.

Intelligence has reached here that previous to the passage of the Georgia ordinance of secession, Harrison W. Riley, a prominent citizen of the mountain region of that State, proclaimed in another portion of Georgia that he was on his way home, and intended to raise a party and take possession of the United States Mint at Dahlonega for the United States Government, in case Georgia passed a secession ordinance. His declaration caused considerable excitement at Milledgeville, and the Governor was requested to send a military force to Dahlonega, but had not done so at the date of the advices.

On the same authority as above we learn that there is a considerable Union element in the mountains of Georgia, and an anti-secession meeting was held in Pickens County, when they heard of the passage of the secession ordinance. The old stars and stripes were run up, and the demonstrations of resistance to secession were emphatic and unequivocal.

The impression, however, was, at Milledgeville, the people of Georgia will generally sustain the ordinance of secession, and cooperate in the formation of a Southern Cotton States Republic.

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