Murray County MuseumMurray County Museum
Home Page | Planned Exhibits | Research Support | Want to Help? | Why a Museum in Cyberspace? | Updates
Carter's QuarterBarbed WireCherokee Removal FTCivil WarCoulter Dolls
County OfficialsDeath CertificatesEarly ChenilleEarly DoctorsEarly Newspapers
Fort MountainFree Negroes 1870GatewaysHistorical County LinesHistorical Markers
History of MurrayKorean WarLandmarks LostListsMemoirs of a Slave
Methodist ChurchMurray ArtistsMurray CemeteriesMurray CharactersMurray Census 1834
Murray FamiliesMurray Heritage BookMurray High SchoolMurray History 1911Murray Memories
Murray Post OfficesMurray QuiltsMurray SchoolsOld News StoriesPhotographs
Planned DisplaysPoemsPrized PossessionsRoad to Dalton 1950Rolling Stores
Roseville PotterySchool ValentinesStained GlassTime CapsulesVann House
Vann SlavesVeterans MemorialVietnam WarVintage ADsWar Dead
Wood VasesWorld War IWorld War IIWright Hotel 
 Murray County Museum  
WORLD WAR I
Murray County Men in World War I
The Great War



Originally called The Great War, later generations have referred to it as World War I. It was billed as the war to end all wars. Such wishful thinking!

The war began in the summer of 1914 and officially ended Nov. 11, 1918, a date remembered by older Americans as Armistice Day.

This war involved all of the world's great powers. More than 70,000,000 military personnel participated in the conflict. Some 60,000,000 were from Europe. Nearly 10,000,000 military personnel died in World War One.

The British Empire lost 885,000 military personnel in the war. France lost 1,398,000 military dead. Italy's loss was more than 650,000. Russia put her military dead at 1,811,000. The United States reported nearly 117,000 dead in the conflict.

Although the war commenced in 1914, the United States only participated in 1917-1918.

Military personnel of neutral countries suffered thousands of losses due to the German sinking of their naval vessels. Approximately half of Norway's fleet was sunk in the war.

Civilian deaths totaled some 7,000,000. War, disease, and starvation contributed to this huge loss. The war so disrupted commerce that food shipments became impossible in some areas; huge numbers of people starved to death. Destroyed homes caused many to die from exposure.

Russia claimed that 1,500,000 civilians died in the war. Russia withdrew before the armistice went into effect because they had just experienced at home the Russian Revolution, an event that soon would change that country into the Soviet Union.

Other countries that reported large numbers of civilian deaths included the U.K. nearly 110,000; Belgium 62,000; France 300,000; Greece 150,000; Italy 590,000; Portugal 82,000; Romania 430,000; and Serbia 450,000.

The opposing side in this war included Austria-Hungary; Bulgaria; the German Empire; and the Ottoman Empire. Their military losses were slightly more than 4,000,000 and civilians who died in the conflict just over 3,000,000.

Soon after the war ended the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires ceased to exist. They were broken up and the maps of Europe were redrawn depicting many new countries.

Murray Men Who Died in World War I

This list is based on the names of dead soldiers from Murray County found on a monument on the east lawn of the Courthouse.

Anyone who has photographs of any of these men in uniform, where faces can be clearly seen, is invited to send them to the museum to be added. Submit by email, preferably in "jpeg" format, to murraymuseum@aol.com If anyone has information about any of the men's military service, especially details of how and where they died, please send that information to be added. Thank you.


Charlie H. Bramblett was born in Murray County, Georgia, probably in 1901. From his earliest days, he was called "Buster." His parents were Charlie H. and Mandy Bramblett. The 1910 Census listed the family as: Charlie H. Bramblett, age 33; Mandy Bramblett, age 31; Frances Bramblett, age 13; Charles W. Bramblett, age 9; and Charlie H. Bramblett, age 9. The family lived in Murray's Doolittle District. Note the father and youngest child had the same name and both would have been within the age range of those who could have served in The Great War. Tim Howard happened to know that the father died shortly after the 1910 Census was recorded so the dead soldier clearly had to be the son called "Buster," who was only 9 years old in 1910.

The 1880 Census listed Bramblett grandparents of the soldier as being William H. Bramblett, born about 1839 in South Carolina, and Francis Bramblett, born about 1847 in Georgia. The grandparents then lived in Murray's Eighth District.

Military casualty listings include Charles H. Bramblett, Private, U. S. Army, serving in the 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, death date July 18, 1918, in France. It appears that his body was not recovered because his name appears on Tablets of the Missing at Aisne-Marne American Cemetery, Belleau, France. Georgia Archives list him as C. H. Bramblett, of Ramhurst. He entered service April 17, 1917, was deployed to Europe December 20, 1917, and was killed in action at Soissons, France, July 18, 1918.

This photo of "Buster" was copied by Robert Green from a book he discovered that had been created by Georgia Archives soon after the war ended. That book appears to have been titled In Memory of Gallant Sons of Georgia. It was "dedicated to the Gold Star Mothers of Georgia in memory of their heroic sons who made the supreme sacrifice in the cause of humanity."

World War I Photograph


Thomas M. Brown was born in Gilmer County, Georgia in 1890. To family and friends he was known as Roy Brown. His parents were Rev. Thomas A. Brown and Callie (Harper) Brown.

The 1900 Census listed Roy's family in Ellijay District, Gilmer County, Georgia, as follows: Thomas A. Brown, age 41, born June 1855; Nannie M. L. Brown, age 13, daughter, born September 1886; Thomas M. Brown, age 16, son, born February 1890; Spurgeon E. Brown, age 7, son, born July 1892; Claudie E. V. Brown, age 3, son, born Nov. 1896; and Vestie B. Brown, age 1, daughter, Dec. 1898. No wife is listed in this Census because Callie had died after giving birth to Vestie.

The 1910 Census listed the family living in the McDonald District, Eton, Murray County: Lone A. Brown, age 50; Gemima Brown, age 38 (wife); Roy Brown, age 18, son; Spurgeon Allen Brown, age 16, son; Claude Brown, age 13, son; Vesta Brown, age 10 daughter; Lofton Brown, age 6, son; Bonn Brown, age 4, daughter; Jewell Brown, age 3, son; and Howell Brown, age 9 months, son. Note that several names here are different than in the 1900 Census: The father, Thomas A. Brown was listed in this Census as Lone A. Brown. Thomas M. Brown was listed here as Roy Brown; this is the man destined to die in World War I.

Military casualty listing for Thomas M. Brown, indicates that he was a Corporal in the U. S. Army, serving with the 325th Infantry Regiment, 82nd Infantry Division. He died in France, October 12, 1918, and was buried in grave B-28-39 at Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery, Romagne, France. Georgia Archives records indicate that Corporal Thomas Monroe Brown was from Eton, that he entered service November 20, 1917, and was deployed to Europe in April 1918. He served in the front line trenches. He was killed in action at the Battle of the Argonne Forest, October 20, 1918.

The first photo of Corporal Brown was copied by Robert Green from a book he discovered that had been created by Georgia Archives soon after the war ended. That book appears to have been titled In Memory of Gallant Sons of Georgia. It was "dedicated to the Gold Star Mothers of Georgia in memory of their heroic sons who made the supreme sacrifice in the cause of humanity."

Roy Brown's niece, Glenda Howard Houston, provided the second photo of Roy's father and mother, with their first three children. Rev. Brown is holding Roy on his lap. His older sister, Nannie is standing in the photo. Roy's younger brother, Spurgeon, is shown sitting in his mother's lap. Although the actual date of the photo is not known, it was taken about 1895.

World War I Photograph
World War I Photograph

World War I Photograph


Clifford Caylor was born about 1895 in Georgia, the son of John and Millie Caylor. The 1910 Census listed the family in Militia District 10, Murray County, as follows: John Caylor, age 40; Millie P. Caylor, age 45; Claud P. Caylor, age 19; Clifford Caylor, age 15; Bernice M. Caylor, age 13; and John R. Caylor, age 6.

Although his name was not found on any military records, Clifford Caylor was buried in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia, Section Eur site 2433. His date of death was October 30, 1918. He had served as a Private in the 168th Infantry, 42nd Division.

Georgia Archives indicate that Clifford Caylor was from Cisco, that he entered military service in June 1918. He was assigned to Co. E., 166th Regiment, the Rainbow Division. He was deployed to Europe in late August 1918. There he went immediately to the front lines. He was wounded and died from the wounds on October 30, 1918.

This photo of Private Caylor was copied by Robert Green from a book he discovered that had been created by Georgia Archives soon after the war ended. That book appears to have been titled In Memory of Gallant Sons of Georgia. It was "dedicated to the Gold Star Mothers of Georgia in memory of their heroic sons who made the supreme sacrifice in the cause of humanity."

World War I Photograph


Robert H. Charles was born December 16, 1886, in Gilmer County, Georgia. His parents were Jesse Charles, 1867 - 1953, and Nancy Louise Ivie Charles, 1870 - 1919. The Census of 1910 listed the family (included several transcription errors) as Jesse Charles; Nancy Charles; Robert H. Charles; William T.; John F. Charles; Mattie M. S. Charles; James O. Charles; Lillie C. Charles; and Ara J. Charles. Every member of the family had been born in Georgia.

Family records provide a few more details. William T. was William Thomas; John F. was John Fletcher; James O. was James Oscar Charles; and Ara J. was actually Eva Jane. After the 1910 Census was recorded a boy, Buell J. Charles was born into the family in 1913.

Two of the boys died in The Great War, both in France. William died August 19, 1918, and Robert died October 18, 1918.

Military records containing details of his death could not be found. Robert H. Charles was an Army Private, who died October 18, 1918 (less than a month before the war ended). He was buried in Section S, Site 14002, Chattanooga National Cemetery, Tennessee.


Note: Please submit photo(s) of this soldier to the museum.

World War I Photograph


William T. Charles was born in 1891 in Georgia. His parents were Jesse Charles, 1867 - 1953, and Nancy Louise Ivie Charles, 1870 - 1919. The Census of 1910 listed the family (included several transcription errors) as Jesse Charles; Nancy Charles; William T.;Robert H. Charles; John F. Charles; Mattie M. S. Charles; James O. Charles; Lillie C. Charles; and Ara J. Charles. Every member of the family had been born in Georgia. The last child's name actually was Eva Jane Charles.

Two of the Charles family died in The Great War, both in France. William died August 19, 1918, and Robert died October 18, 1918.

William Thomas Charles was an Army Private when he was killed in France, August 19, 1918. Military records were not found. He was buried in Section S, Site 14069, Chattanooga National Cemetery, Tennessee.


Note: Please submit photo(s) of this soldier to the museum.

World War I Photograph


Frank Dunn was born July 1890 in Tennessee. His parents were both born in Tennessee. The 1900 Census listed the family living in Spring Place as follows: Leander Dunn, age 47; Selpha Dunn, age 45; Cora L. Dunn, age 17; and Frank Dunn, age 9.

World War I casualty lists indicate that Frank Dunn, from Georgia, was an Army Private with the 165th Infantry Regiment, 42nd Infantry Division, in France. He died there on July 31, 1918, and was buried in grave B-7-6 at Oise-Sisne American Cemetery, at Fere-en-Tardenois, France.

Georgia Archives records indicate that Frank Dunn was from Eton. He began military service in August 1917, was sent to Europe February 1, 1918. He was assigned to Co. C, 16th Infantry, where he served in the front line trenches. He was killed in action at Meurcy Farm, north of Chateau-Thierry, July 31, 1918.

This photo of Private Dunn was copied by Robert Green from a book he discovered that had been created by Georgia Archives soon after the war ended. That book appears to have been titled In Memory of Gallant Sons of Georgia. It was "dedicated to the Gold Star Mothers of Georgia in memory of their heroic sons who made the supreme sacrifice in the cause of humanity."

World War I Photograph


Walter M. Elliott was born January 2, 1895 in Murray County, Georgia. The 1910 Census listed his family as Harve P. Eliot, age 40; Martha C. Eliot, age 37; Walter M. Eliot, age 15; Carl S. Eliot, age 9; Nora Eliot, age 6; Walker Eliot, age 1. Everyone in the family had been born in Georgia. They lived in the Shuck Pen District.

Family history provided additional information. Father's full name was Thomas Harvey Elliott and he lived 1870 - 1930. Mother was Martha Cordelia Poindexter Elliott, 1873 - 1955. Walter's middle name was Monroe. Carl was known as "Sammie." Nora's middle name was Pearl. Walker's middle name was Clayton. Two more children were born after the 1910 Census was recorded: Cora Cordelia Elliott, 1911 - 1981, and Flora Estelle Elliott, 1914 - 1980.

Walter's draft card listed him as Walter Munroe Elliott, born January 2, 1895, from Murray County, Georgia.

Family history indicates that Walter had unexpectedly come home on leave and was supposed to deploy to the war in Europe after his leave. Walter had measles and his dad told him not to come to the house and possibly infect the whole family. So Walter reportedly stayed at an uncle's house. Within a few days both Walter and a very young cousin died. That cousin probably was Leroy Elliott, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Elliott, who died at age 4 on the same date as Walter.

Walter was buried in Center Valley United Methodist Church Cemetery. His gravestone reads: Walter M. Elliott, Son of T. H. and M. C. Elliott, Jan. 2, 1895 - January 26, 1918. "A treasure in Heaven to beckon us to a higher life."


Note: Please submit photo(s) of this soldier to the museum.

World War I Photograph


James R. Fortner was born in Murray County, Georgia, October 16, 1896. Although the Census listed the father's name as Mills Fortner, family records called him Miles. The 1910 Census listed the family in Town District (Spring Place), Murray County. Miles H. was 38; Laura was 33; James R., was 14; Hallie A., was 12; William H., was 10; Thena E. Was 8; John H., was 6; Myrtle C. Was 3; and Marion H. Fortner was newly born.

Family records list mother's maiden name as Thompson.

Miles H. Fortner lived 1872 - 1950. Laura Louella Fortner lived 1876 - 1924.

Another child was born after the 1910 Census was recorded. This was Clifton Harold Fortner, born in 1913.

World War I casualty listings indicate that James R. Fortner, from Georgia, was a Private in the U.S. Army, assigned to the 325th Infantry Regiment, 82nd Infantry Division. He died October 11, 1918, in France. He was buried in grave B-15-20 at Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery, Romagne, France.

Georgia Archives records indicate that James Robert Fortner was from Eton. He entered military service November 17, 1917 and was sent overseas in April 1918. He was assigned to Company M, 325th Infantry Regiment, 82nd Infantry Division. He served in the front line trenches. He was killed while carrying wounded soldiers off the battlefield.

This photo of Private Fortner was copied by Robert Green from a book he discovered that had been created by Georgia Archives soon after the war ended. That book appears to have been titled In Memory of Gallant Sons of Georgia. It was "dedicated to the Gold Star Mothers of Georgia in memory of their heroic sons who made the supreme sacrifice in the cause of humanity."

World War I Photograph

World War I Photograph


Joe N. Harrison was was born October 28, 1892 in Murray County, Georgia. His full name was Joseph Nathaniel Harrison, he was called Joe. His parents were William Henry and Jane (Logan) Harrison. The 1900 Census listed the family as William Harrison, age 52; Jane Harrison, age 45; Emma Harrison, age 25; William Harrison, age 24; Mamie Harrison, age 22; George Harrison, age 19; Tennie Harrison, age 17; Lee Harrison, age 15; Dovie Harrison, age 12; Joseph Harrison, age 8; Jasper Harrison age 6; and Jennie Harrison, age 4.

When the 1910 Census was taken, the father had died, Lee J. Harrison, age 24, was listed as head of the household. His mother was living with him. Lee was unmarried and six of his siblings lived with him, including Joe N., age 17. They lived in Ball Ground District of Murray.

Military records contained only a listing in World War I Casualties. Joe N. Harrison, from Georgia, an Army Private assigned to the 102nd Infantry Regiment, 26th Infantry Divsion, died July 23, 1918 in France. He was buried in grave A-1-1 at Oise-Aisne American Cemetery, in Fere-en-Tardenois, France.

This photo of Private Harrison was submitted directly to this museum.

World War I Photograph


Gordon Higdon was born in Murray County, Georgia, December 7, 1893. His parents were Samuel and Martha (Patterson) Higdon. Both parents were born in North Carolina. The Censuses of 1900 and 1910 show the family living in Alaculsy, Murray County. In 1910 the family was recorded as: Samuel Higdon, age 32; Martha Higdon, age 27; Simon G. Higdon, age 11; Harriet Higdon, age 10; Emma Higdon, age 8; Gordon Higdon, age 6; Polly L. Higdon, age 4; Lillie Higdon, age 2; and Samuel W. Higdon, 3 months old.

The 1910 Census listed the father as Samuel Higdon, Jr. It also included 4 children born after 1900: Lela J. Higdon, age 6; Joseph B. Higdon, age 4; William J. Higdon, age 2; and Benjamin T. Higdon, 2 months old.

A book titled Enlisted Men of the U.S. Navy Who Lost Their Lives During the World War lists Gordon Higdon, Seaman, U.S. Navy, enlisted at Portland, Oregon, Dec. 12, 1917. Died aboard the USS Chew, January 10, 1918. Cause of death: drowned. Next of kin: father, Sam Higdon, Cisco, Georgia.

The first photo is of the USN Hall, the ship upon which Gordon Higdon was serving when he drowned.

The second picture is of Gordon in his Navy uniform. Locating and acquiring this photo for the museum involved dedicated effort by several individuals: Paul Ross, Becky Harris Whaley, Betty Kilgore James, and Frank Higdon, the owner of the photo, who now lives in Texas. Thanks for all the effort!


Note: Please submit photo(s) of this soldier to the museum.

World War I Photograph
World War I Photograph


Joseph A. Kilgore The initial A stood for Avington. The man was called Joe. The Census of 1900 listed the family, living at Spring Place, as Beau S. Kilgore, age 38; Sarah L. Kilgore, age 31; William C. Kilgore, age 9; Samuel M. Kilgore, age 6; Joe A. Kilgore, age 4; and Luther H. Kilgore, age 1. The household also included Mandy E. Kilgore, age 59. Everyone in the family had been born in Georgia.

The Census of 1910 listed the father as Beauguard Kilgore. It also included 3 children born after the 1900 Census was recorded. The new members of the family were Bettie Kilgore, age 9; Claughton Kilgore, age 8; and Hughs Kilgore, age 4. The woman listed earlier as Mandy E. Kilgore was in this Census listed as Elizabeth Kilgore, age 70.

Family records provided a few additional details. Father's name was Beauregard. He lived 1862 - 1922. Sarah's maiden name was Bramblett. She lived 1868 -1936. William's middle name was Charles and he was called Charlie. Samuel's middle name was Miles and he was called Sammie. Luther's middle name was Henry. Claughton's middle name was Hunter and he was called Claud. James Hughes Kilgore was the correct name of youngest child. He was called Jim.

Military records were not found. The circumstances and location of his death were not discovered, however, he was buried in Murray County. A grave marker in New Hope-Kilgore Cemetery lists: Joseph A. Kilgore, Pvt., Company A, 2nd Infantry, Republic Regiment. Oct. 24, 1896, Nov. 15, 1918. "Forever with the Lord."

Nearby are markers for his parents. One lists simply: B. Kilgore, 1862 - 1922. The other: Sara Kilgore, wife of B. Kilgore, Dec. 1868 - Although she died in 1936, that date has not been added to her tombstone.

Records in Georgia Archives indicate that Joseph A. Kilgore was from Spring Place. He entered military service August 26, 1918, and was deployed to Europe October 19, 1918. He was assigned to Co. A., 2nd Infantry. He died of pneumonia in American Hospital #52, in France, November 15, 1918–four days after the war officially ended.

This photo of Private Kilgore was copied by Robert Green from a book he discovered that had been created by Georgia Archives soon after the war ended. That book appears to have been titled In Memory of Gallant Sons of Georgia. It was "dedicated to the Gold Star Mothers of Georgia in memory of their heroic sons who made the supreme sacrifice in the cause of humanity."

World War I Photograph

Thanks to Betty Lou Kilgore James, and her son Brent, for providing the following to the museum. First picture is of Joe Kilgore. Second is of a memory document presented to the family at the time of his death. Third picture is of the 48-star flag that draped his coffin.

World War I Photograph
World War I Photograph
World War I Photograph


Cicero C. Luffman was born March 8, 1894, in Murray County. The Census of 1900 listed the family as Jons Luffman, age 50; Nancie L. Luffman, age 41; William W. Luffman, age 17; Hettie J. Luffman, age 14; Osker J. Luffman, age 12; Joe S. Luffman, age 8; Ethel M. Luffman, age 8; and Cisero C. Luffman, age 6. The father had been born in North Carolina, the mother in Georgia.

The Census of 1910 listed the family a bit differently: Jones Luffman; Nancy Luffman; Hattie J. Luffman; Joseph S. Luffman; Columbus Luffman; and Oscar J. Luffman. The Columbus here was Cisero from 1900.

Family records indicate that his name was Cicero Columbus Luffman and that he was called "Ro." His mother was Nancy Louise Lowery. William's middle name was Walter. Hattie's middle name was Jane. Oscar's middle name was Jefferson.

Cicero Luffman's military records were not found. Circumstances of his death are unknown. However, he was buried in Murray's New Prospect Cemetery. His tombstone reads: C. C. Luffman, Co. D, 20th Infantry, March 8, 1895, June 6, 1917. "Here lies the sweetest bud of hope that ever to life was given." His father's grave nearby is inscribed only Jones Luffman, Jan. 27, 1850, Mar. 10, 1919. No marker bearing his mother's name was found. Obtaining a picture of Ro Luffman was a real challenge, involving Jimmy Luffman, Carolyn Z. Luffman, Bertha (Luffman) Walls, and the estate of Oscar Luffman. This picture of Cicero C. "Ro" Luffman is courtesy of the estate's collection of photographs.

World War I Photograph


World War I Photograph


Ossie P. Parker was born about 1896 in Georgia. The 1910 Census recorded his family living in Calhoun, Gordon County, as John H. Parker, age 52; Annie Parker, age 34; Bessie Parker, age 17; Ossie Parker, age 14; Melbourne Parker, age 13; and Marvin Parker, 5 months old. All of the family had been born in Georgia. Although his military records were not found, his burial record in Arlington National Cemetery indicates that he was a Private, C Battery, 42nd CAC. He died September 8, 1918. His grave is in Section Eur Site 2294.

Anyone who has photos of this soldier is asked to submit a copy to the museum for posting.

Thanks to Robert Green for providing the following picture of Private Parker's grave marker.

World War I Photograph


Note: Please submit photo(s) of this soldier to the museum.


James T. Pullen was born April 30, 1888, in Murray County. The Census of 1910 listed the family as Andrew J. Pullen, age 47; Lucy I. Pullen, age 31; John W. Pullen, age 21; James T. Pullen, age 19; Georg W. C. Pullen, age 17; Charles C. Pullen, age 14; Melvin E. Pullen, age 3; and Bessie F. Pullen, age 1. The Census noted that this was the second marriage for the father and first for his wife–this explains how a woman aged 31 could appear to have a son age 21. The father's middle initial should have been listed as G because his middle name was Greenville.

Andrew's first wife was Sarah Lou Murray (1967-1897). Sarah was mother of the soldier who died in World War I. After Sarah died, Andrew married Lucy L. Ridley (1879-1952). An unusual grave marker lists Andrew G. Pullen and both of his wives on the same tombstone in Sumach Cumberland Presbyterian Cemetery, Murray County, Georgia.

James T. Pullen's draft registration card indicated that his middle name was Taylor, that he was a natural born citizen of the U.S., he was single, worked as a farmer, and listed his address as Fairy, Murray County, Georgia. He had brown hair, brown eyes, was described as tall and stout.

Other military records listed James T. Pullen as an Army Private, Serial Number 3486339, who died in France, September 23, 1918. He was serving with Company L, 128th U.S. Infantry, 32nd Division when he died. Details of his death were not found. He was buried in American Cemetery 405, Grave 266, Plot G, at Chaumont, Hte-Marne, France. After the war his body was exhumed and he was reburied in Chattanooga National Cemetery, Section S, site 13586.

World War I Photograph


Dan G. Timms was born August 18, 1899. The Census of 1910 listed the family living in Spring Place as: Jim Timms, age 35; Zoria Timms, age 34; Dan Timms, age 10; William Timms, age 8; Jessie Timms, age 6; Joe Timms, age 4; Lee Timms, age 3; and Grover Timms, age 1.

Family records indicate that the father's legal name was James Timms and that he was born in 1874. The mother's name was Missouri Jenkins. She lived 1875 - 1920.

No military records were found. Where and how he died are not known.

A tombstone in Casey Springs Cemetery reads: Dan G. Timms, Aug. 18, 1899 - July 24, 1917 Co. M, 17th Infantry. Grave markers for his parents are in the same row. Jim Tims, 1874 - 1941. Masur Timms, 1875 - 1920. Yes, that is the marker for Dan's mother.


Note: Please submit photo(s) of this soldier to the museum.

World War I Photograph


MURRAY COUNTY VETERANS OF WORLD WAR I

Note: The expansion of this list will have to be through the submission of names by museum visitors. These initial names are men whose names appear on bricks in Murray Veterans Memorial Park and the list of dead from the monument on the courthouse lawn.

Please send names to be added to MurrayMuseum@aol.com and be patient! We only update when we have several names to add at the same time.


Adams, Homer, PFC, US Army, 1917-1918
Akins, George L. (Sr). Name Added. His son, George L. Akins, Jr. Died in WW II.
Arthur, Ernest C, PFC, US Army, WW 1, 1916-1919
Arthur, James T, PFC, US Army, WW 1, 1917-1919

Baggett, William, U.S. Army
Barrett, Robert Lee, 2nd Lt, US Army Calvary, 1917-1918
Baxter, Leamon Newt, PFC, US Army, 1917-1919
Bramblett, Charlie H. (Buster), Pvt. US Army, KIA July 18, 1918, France
Brooks, Leonard Doke Sr, PVT, US Army, 1917-1918
Brown, Claude, US Army, WW I
Brown, Roy, (name actually was Thomas M. Brown, but he was called "Roy"), Corporal, US Army, KIA Oct 12, 1918, France.
Brown, Spurgeon, US Army, WW I

Caylor, Clifford, US Army, KIA Oct 30, 1918. Buried Arlington National Cemetery
Charles, Robert H., Pvt. US Army, KIA Oct. 18, 1918, France
Charles, William T. Pvt. US Army, KIA Aug. 19, 1918, France

Dixon, Juel F, PVT, US Army, 1918
Dunn, Frank, Pvt. US Army, KIA July 31, 1918, France
Dunn, William L, PVT, US Army, 1918-1919

Elliott, Walter M., US Army, died of measles Jan. 26, 1918, in Murray County

Fortner, James R., Pvt. US Army, KIA Oct 11, 1918, France

Gray, Curtis N, PVT, US Army, 1916-1918

Harrison, Joe N., Pvt. US Army, KIA July 23, 1918, France
Henderson, Carl O, SGT, US Army, 1917-1919
Higdon, Gordon, Seaman, US Navy, died by drowning Jan. 10, 1918

Jackson, William Jesse, CPL, US Army, 1916-1918
Jones, Hill, U.S. Navy
Jones, Thomas, PFC, US Army, 1917-1918, 2 Purple Hearts

Kilgore, Joseph A., Pvt. US Army, died Nov 15, 1918

Leonard, Frank, name added at family's request.

Luffman, Cicero C., US Army, died June 6, 1917

McEntire, S. Henry, PVT, US Army, 1916-1919
Morrison, John W, PFC, US Army, 1914-1918

Parker, Ossie P., Pvt. US Army, died Sept. 8, 1918, buried Arlington National Cemetery
Pellom, Conard H, Cpl., Battery C 26th Artillery CAC US Army 1918
Pierce, Barnie R., U.S. Army
Pritchett, Willie Lee, PFC, US Army, World War 1, 1921
Pullen, James T., Pvt. US Army, died Sept. 23, 1918, buried Chattanooga National Cemetery

Roe, Robert W, PFC, US Army, 1918-1924

Swilling, W Gene, PFC, US Army, World War 1

Timms, Dan G., US Army, died July 24, 1917
Townsend, Ben Borders, PVT, US Army, 1917-1919

Wilbanks, Robert Hill, PFC, US Army, 1917-1919
Wilbanks, Vince E, PVT, US Army, 1912 -1915



  Murray County Museum 
© Copyrighted 2005 - 2017 Murray County Museum - All Rights Reserved